The National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) says it received over 450 human rights-related cases from the February 25 and March 18 elections in which 88 people died.

The human rights adviser to the NHRC’s executive secretary, Hilary Ogbonna, announced this Monday at a media briefing.

The NHRC inaugurated the Mobilising Voters for Election (MOVE) on October 17, 2022. MOVE is a multifaceted and multi-dimensional programme and human rights-based campaign that seeks to facilitate access and promote the electorate’s participation in the 2023 elections.

MOVE’s broad goal is to promote access, participation, credibility and accountability in the 2023 elections in Nigeria.

The NHRC said it set up a National Hate Speech Register in October 2022, recording 22 hate speech cases, with investigations launched on committed before, during and after the elections.

The commission revealed that 88 people died during the elections.

“The emerging external threats and fear existing are insecurity and violence across the country. There are hate speech and incitement from politicians and their supporters. New threats are the attack on media organisations and intimidation of the judiciary,” stated the NHRC.

The commission added, “Possible impacts are loss of faith and integrity in the judicial process. Incitement leads to renewed violence and ethnic violence.”

NHRC boss, Tony Ojukwu, said, “You have been with us through the process, and it is important that we brief you on how far we have gone. We thank the media and our partners, (the) UN resident coordinator, Ford Foundation and Legal Defence and Assistance Project (LEDAP). It is important, whatever happens, that we should remain law-abiding. This is the only way we can develop as human beings.”